Abercombie & Kent “Goes Solo”

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When you travel on your own, you’re never alone with Abercrombie & Kent (A&K), the luxury tour operator points out in introducing its Solo Savings program. By either waiving all single supplements or reducing them by as much as 75 percent on more than 30 Solo Traveler departures to popular destinations, A&K’s president Scott Wiseman makes it clear that his company has stepped up to make it even easier to go solo with A&K.

And this travel market niche is increasing steadily with Abercrombie & Kent. “Small group escorted travel is a natural for solo travelers,” says Wiseman, “not only because it is a great guarantor of safety, security and savings, but because it enables those on their own to both share experiences with other like-minded travelers and enjoy their own private accommodations.” Wiseman notes that a recent survey of A&K solo travelers gave many reasons for traveling solo, including 25 percent who just prefer to travel alone to pursue their own interests.

Solo Savings applies to the 12-day Highlights of China, visiting Beijing, Xian, and exploring the Yangtze River aboard the Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer. The tour is priced from $5,475, with a single supplement of $945 (formerly $1,890).

Three of Abercombie & Kent’s tours in East Africa have dropped single supplements entirely. The Snows of Kilimanjaro, an 11-day ascent of Africa’s highest mountain, is priced from $5,340; for Tanzania Wildlife Discovery, an 11-day tour, the lead cost is $5,650; and 11-day Wings over Kenya flies all passengers between permanent tented and A&K mobile camps for the same price: from $8,775. (FYI: The single supplement on the Wings tour was $1,380.)

Turkey: A Journey Through History, a 13-day tour, is priced from $9,975, plus $951 single supplement, reduced from $3,805. And Egypt Unveiled, an 11-day tour featuring a cruise aboard Sun Boat IV, also waived the single supplement of $1,380 for a basic cost starting at $5,165.

When you travel on your own, you’re never alone with Abercrombie & Kent (A&K), the luxury tour operator points out in introducing its Solo Savingsprogram. By either waiving all single supplements or reducing them by as much as 75 percent on more than 30 Solo Traveler departures to popular destinations, A&K’s president Scott Wiseman makes it clear that his company has stepped up to make it even easier to go solo with A&K.

And this travel market niche is increasing steadily with Abercrombie & Kent. “Small group escorted travel is a natural for solo travelers,” says Wiseman, “not only because it is a great guarantor of safety, security and savings, but because it enables those on their own to both share experiences with other like-minded travelers and enjoy their own private accommodations.” Wiseman notes that a recent survey of A&K solo travelers gave many reasons for traveling solo, including 25 percent who just prefer to travel alone to pursue their own interests.

Solo Savings applies to the 12-day Highlights of China, visiting Beijing, Xian, and exploring the Yangtze River aboard the Sanctuary Yangzi Explorer. The tour is priced from $5,475, with a single supplement of $945 (formerly $1,890).

Three of Abercombie & Kent’s tours in East Africa have dropped single supplements entirely. The Snows of Kilimanjaro, an 11-day ascent of Africa’s highest mountain, is priced from $5,340; for Tanzania Wildlife Discovery, an 11-day tour, the lead cost is $5,650; and 11-day Wings over Kenya flies all passengers between permanent tented and A&K mobile camps for the same price: from $8,775. (FYI: The single supplement on the Wings tour was $1,380.)

Turkey: A Journey Through History, a 13-day tour, is priced from $9,975, plus $951 single supplement, reduced from $3,805. And Egypt Unveiled, an 11-day tour featuring a cruise aboard Sun Boat IV, also waived the single supplement of $1,380 for a basic cost starting at $5,165.

According to Wiseman, clients who cancelled their Egypt vacations were rebooked to Africa tours and safaris, which, “resulted in a 67 percent jump in A&K travelers to Kenya alone for the first quarter, and South America was another beneficiary of cancelations to Egypt.”

For the future, Geoffrey Kent is betting heavily on China, where he said infrastructure is the problem in the country’s unique areas. However, as in Abercrombie & Kent’s early days in Africa, it seems that Kent once again believes that, “build it, and they will come” to the southwest of China, for instance, and other exotic points along the Silk Road. And another region closer to home that Abercrombie & Kent is all geared up to introduce is Cuba. According to Kent, “When Cuba opens up—and indications are that should be soon—we are ready to go with a 10-day program, for starters.”